By Giuseppina Di Paola, Coordinator of the First Academic Diploma in “Textile & Fashion design”

 

The workshop is dedicated to analyzing some frontier studies of artificial intelligence (such as artificial emotions and artificial creativity) and the potential they offer with respect to two main aspects: on the one hand, the possibility of “new machines” of think and feel emotions as a human being and, on the other hand, the ability to teach these machines to elaborate emotional thoughts and, in doing so, to transmit to them hierarchies of values and make them develop a kind of creativity. In examining the state of the art of these applications, students will confront the classical themes of the processes of identity and role building (Goffman, Berger and Luckmann, Dahrendorf, Mead), to understand if, and in which terms, the development of artificial intelligence affects the construction of identity, if it is possible to talk about the construction of a digital identity and if the affirmation of these applications is destined to change the way in which individuals perceive themselves. During the workshop, students will be asked to think and design an object (physical or digital) representative of the function that “new machines” can take in the creation of emotions and in the generation of identities.

 

 

GIUSEPPINA DI PAOLA

Fashion designer and founder of the brand “Agata Della Torre”, Giuseppina  Di Paola graduated in Political Science at the University of Turin with a thesis on fashion as a cultural process and then took an ASP Master in “Fashion Project”. Her collections, inspired by architecture and art, have become known for their adoption of an innovative formal language and have received attention from major international fashion magazines such as Vogue, Glamor, Cosmopolitan, Vatra, and Beandlife. Her Agata Della Torre brand, which launched its flagship store in Milan in 2013, has taken part in the major European fashion weeks, including Tranoï in Paris, and has been distributed in Italy, Holland, Greece, Spain, and Japan. In 2011, she founded the IUDe project, a collective of international fashion designers whose goal is to support the creative path of independent designers and which now has its own store in Turin. In 2013, together with IUDe’s designers, she collaborated with Artissima.

 

RESULTS

The workshop was dedicated to analyzing some experimental studies on artificial intelligence (such as artificial emotions and artificial creativity) and the potential they offer regarding two main areas: on the one hand, the possibility that “new machines” can think and feel emotions like a human being and, on the other hand, the ability to teach these machines to elaborate emotional thoughts, transmitting to them hierarchies of values, causing them to develop a sort of creativity. Examining the state of the art of these applications, students discussed the classical themes relating to the processes of identity and role in order to understand how the development of artificial intelligence can influence their construction, whether it is possible to talk about the construction of a digital identity and if the affirmation of these applications is destined to change how individuals perceive themselves. During the workshop, students were asked to design a ‘cyber apprentice’ (CyA), choosing whether to conceive it as a simple tool with a friendly interface, as a virtual helper, as a work colleague or even … as a friend.

We found that some students created the CyA as an instrument able to help with work, making it less tiring; others have instead imagined the CyA as a collaborator able to make work more stimulating and suggestive, accompanying – through forms of augmented reality as well – the research phase that usually precedes the creative projects. For others, finally, the CyA was transformed into a friend capable not only of helping in work but of being a partner capable of sharing emotions, giving value to the actions that it carried out. 

The workshop was introduced by Viviana Bovo and Rossana Damiano, professors from the Department of Computer Science of the University of Turin and experts on artificial emotions and computational creativity.